Life is Like a Jigsaw Puzzle

Design your own journey







Leadership and Respect



Possessing the right kind of leadership with your horse will significantly influence the entire relationship – both on the ground and in the saddle. Most importantly, leadership and respect can help keep you safe. Horses are powerful animals with hard-wired herd needs and dominance behaviors.



The popular concept of Natural Horsemanship advises us that horses are herd animals and need a leader. But, how do you convey your leadership to your horse in a manner that the horse will understand?

Learn how horses communicate leadership to each other. . . and, then learn to read your own horse. What is he or she saying to you? How can you gain the respect that will keep you safe?


This session will review horse behavior. You will learn how to use the horse’s natural flight and herd instincts to gain your horse’s respect and position yourself as its leader in a safe manner for you.

Men and women do interact differently with horses – not better or worse. . . just differently. Learn how to adjust your individual style to maximize safety and enjoyment of your horse.

Depending upon the number of riders and questions, your customized session might last 3 – 5 hours. Arrange for a private session for you, your family, or a small group.


About GerrieContact Gerrie

Check out these additional Equestrian topics

Equestrian CoachingBuying a HorseOwning & Caring for a HorseLeadership & RespectGround Work & Round Pen TrainingSelling a HorseClinicsVideo ReviewLiability ReleaseBook GerrieAbout Gerrie

Read Articles by Gerrie

"I enjoyed your leadership clinic. The information about natural horse behavior was very insightful. It helped me recognize and understand my mare's behaviors and how I can work with those behaviors to be a good leader." --Becky M.


“Thanks so much for helping me understand what I could do about my horse’s pushiness. I knew it wasn’t right, but didn’t know what to do about it.” --Marjorie A.


“I feel so much more confident handling my horse. And I’m enjoying her more.” --Kathy H.